rfi

On air
  • RFI English Live
  • Latest Bulletin
  • RFI French Live

Terrorism Security Marseille

Issued on • Modified

‘Corrections’ and ‘sanctions’ to follow Marseille attack

media
People attend the funerals of Mauranne and Laura, two 20-year-old cousins stabbed on October 1, 2017 outside Saint-Charles train station in the coastal city of Marseille at the church of Eguilles, southern France, on October 5, 2017. BERTRAND LANGLOIS / AFP

There will be ‘corrections’ and ‘sanctions’ after the administrative inquiry into why Ahmed Hanachi was released from police custody, a day before he murdered two young women the train station in Marseille.


“We will look at what worked and where it didn’t work. There will be adjustments and even sanctions,” the minister for the interior, Gérard Collomb, said Sunday.

Hanachi released

The results of the inquiry into what happened in Marseille and why Hanachi was freed after he had been detained by the police in Lyon will be made public on Tuesday.

Hanachi had been arrested in Lyon on Friday after a burglary and was detained overnight before being released on Saturday.

"The Lyon prosecutor's office had instigated a burglary investigation against the 29-year-old Tunisian, who was in France without papers,” Paris prosecutor François Molins said.

“Subsequently the local prefectural authorities had not been able to take measures against him."

"I can tell you that it will be an essential concern for me to look at all the malfunctions and put an end to them," Collomb added on French TV network BFM.

Islamic State involvement?

The attacked was claimed by the Islamic State armed group.

Collomb said that it was not yet clear whether there was a direct link between Hanachi and IS, but that it was clear, at the very least, that they had inspired Hanachi to do what he did.

During the attack, which happened on Sunday, 1st of October, witnesses said they heard the suspect shout "Allahu Akbar" before the attack, according to local media.

The suspect fatally stabbed two women in their 20s in the Mediterranean port city's St Charles train station on Sunday afternoon. They were cousins, according to the investigation.

The man then ran towards military police who were patrolling the station, who shot him dead.

French President Emmanuel Macron tweeted after the attack that he was "deeply angered by this barbaric act."

The attack came two days before French MPs are set to voted in a counterterrorism bill that turns certain aspects of the temporary powers granted under the state of emergency into law.

Under the bill, as under the state of emergency, authorities are able to search properties and place people on house arrest without a warrant from a judge.

This marks the longest uninterrupted state of emergency in France since the Algerian War of Independence.