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Kenya Nigeria Press review South Africa

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African press review 1 November 2018

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Body of the missing Nigerian Major-General found in an abandoneed well. Is South Africa wasting too much time on rape trials? And a trigger-happy Kenyan policewoman guns down a family of crime suspects in a vicious slum shooting.

 


We begin in Nigeria where several newspapers lead with the discovery of the remains of army General Major-General Mohammed Idris Alkali who went missing in September on his way to his Plateau State village.

Vanguard reports that the remains of the retired chief of the Administration at army headquarters were found in an abandoned well in a Jos South Local Government Area on Wednesday by an army search and rescue team.

Premium Times claims that one of four suspects arrested in connection with the murder participated in the location of the General's body.

The military’s top commander in Jos, Brig. Gen. Umar Mohammed who coordinated the operation told the publication that the suspect who led his men to the site, handed himself in, after being declared wanted by the army.

Daily Post says the army hasn't ruled out the possible involvement of highly-placed people in Major General Idris Alkali's murder.

The Jos military commander told newsmen there were about to begin a third phase of operations to find and prosecute all those who took part in this heinous act , no matter how highly connected they could be.

 

In South Africa, Times live launches a fervent appeal for the speeding up of rape trials in the country with the highest rape rate in the world.

Out of more than 51,000 crimes of a sexual nature reported to the South African Police Service in 2016, only 14% of perpetrators of rape are convicted in South Africa, according to official statistics.

The paper quotes a senior clerk at Cape Town’s Magistrate’s Court as saying that it takes months at times for a rape survivor to testify adding that people appear in court just to get their trial postponed.

According to the Times, chances of finding DNA evidence are slim when the offender is alleged to have raped someone [repeatedly] for weeks‚ months‚ or years.

The less evidence there is‚ the more likely the trial is to be postponed argues the Times.

A study by the United Nations Office on Crimes and Drugs projects that a woman is raped every 36 seconds in the country and that 40% of South African women will be raped in their lifetime.

In Kenya, Daily Nation investigates a shocking slum shooting by a vicious policewoman in the Nairobi slum of Dandora slum.

The paper reports that the trigger happy constable gunned down at least three members of a family and a university student over the theft of a scooter seized from a boda boda rider last Sunday.

The Nation reports that the Independent Policing Oversight Authority spent the better part of Wednesday interrogating the families and their neighbours.

This was while human rights organizations launched independent investigations into the circumstances that led to the fatal shootings and whether the police officers were justified in the use of their firearms against unarmed suspects.”